Author Archives: metadn

TUP 2015 Entertainment Activities Section (L4)

Entertainment is about fun – enjoying movies, playing games, and other engaging activities. Having fun isn’t confined to Game Consoles, nor only to home-owned devices. (Yes, employer-provided devices are used for entertainment.) Also, Entertainment Activities aren’t only popular among the youngest adults.
This section includes entertainment activities-related answers selected from the many questions in the comprehensive TUP survey. The key banner points are four: the primary device type for entertainment (PC, Media Tablet, Mobile Phone), Breadth of Entertainment Activities (Fewest, Moderate, Broadest), Primary Device Type (Smartphone, Tower Desktop, Notebook, Tablet), and Primary Device Operating System (Windows, Apple, Google). The data-rich deliverable is designed for quick recognition of important findings, including statistical testing and indexes comparing values to their national averages. This report results cover many key topics: user and household demographics, and activities (major, entertainment, device activities, PC activities, Home PC activities, Game Console activities).

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TUP 2015 Communication Activities Section (L3)

Communication is more than a phone call, and the mixture of modes continues to shift. Text messaging is more popular among some segments and on certain devices than on others. Similarly, email and video calls have claimed their own unique groups of users.
This section includes communication activities-related answers selected from the many questions in the comprehensive TUP survey. The key banner points are four: the primary device type for communication (PC, Media Tablet, Mobile Phone), Breadth of Communication Activities (Fewest, Moderate, Broadest), Primary Device Type (Smartphone, Tower Desktop, Notebook, Tablet), and Primary Device Operating System (Windows, Apple, Google). The data-rich deliverable is designed for quick recognition of important findings, including statistical testing and indexes comparing values to their national averages. This report results cover many key topics: user and household demographics, and activities (major, communication, device activities, PC activities, Home PC activities).

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TUP 2015 Work/Self PCs Section (E3)

PCs provided by one’s employer or in self-employment are meant to be used only for work activities. Throughout their one life, users bring their experiences and preferences with them as they move between one PC and another. The market for Work PCs is different from the consumer market, even though many work PCs are acquired through consumer channels and were originally targeted to consumers, not employees.
This section includes PC-related answers selected from the many questions in the comprehensive TUP survey. The key banner points are three: the Work/Self-Employment PC, and segments (Self-employed to 99 employees, 100 to 999 employees, and 1,000+ Employees) (Self-employed to 19 employees, 20-499, and 500+). The data-rich deliverable is designed for quick recognition of important findings, including statistical testing and indexes comparing values to their national averages. This report results cover many key topics: PC brands and newness, OS & OS ecosystems, other connected devices, user and household demographics, technology adoption patterns (early adopters vs. laggards), device combinations, details about the usage profile, PC activities, consumer electronics, purchase plans, and technology spending. PCs are split out in more detail by form factor: Desktop, Notebook, All-in-One/Mini, and Tower Desktop.

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TUP 2015 Device OS Ecosystems Section (D3)

No Connected Device is an island – each is part of an ecosystem. While Google, Apple, and Microsoft each want to attract users who will use their Operating Systems across all of their devices, that’s not the current reality. Instead, many users use a mixture and others are starting to show a preference for one OS ecosystem or the other.
This section includes details about devices and their OS ecosystems with answers selected from the many questions in the comprehensive TUP survey. The banner points reflect the user’s current combination: Windows (Not Google, Not Apple), Windows and Google (Not Apple), Windows and Apple (Not Google), Windows and Apple and Google, Apple (Not Windows, Not Google), and any other combination.
The data-rich deliverable is designed for quick recognition of important findings, including statistical testing and indexes comparing values to their national averages. This report results cover many key topics: user and household demographics, adoption patterns (early adopters to laggards), device usage profiles, and activities (major, social networking, shopping, communication, entertainment, graphics/image, information/search, cloud storage/sharing, personal/productivity, device activities), tech spending, and purchase plans.

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TUP 2015 Social Networking Activities Section (L1)

Social Networking is a special class of activities with Connected Devices, having grown into the mainstream. While Facebook is currently the widest-used social network, others have grown in acceptance, and in many cases claiming their own unique market segment. Meanwhile, while some users connect with their friends on a PC, others use their mobile phone or tablet.
This section includes social networking activities-related answers selected from the many questions in the comprehensive TUP survey. The key banner points are four: the primary device type for social networking (PC, Media Tablet, Mobile Phone), Breadth of Social Network Activities (Fewest, Moderate, Broadest), Primary Device Type (Smartphone, Tower Desktop, Notebook, Tablet), and Primary Device Operating System (Windows, Apple, Google). The data-rich deliverable is designed for quick recognition of important findings, including statistical testing and indexes comparing values to their national averages. This report results cover many key topics: Social networks used (and not used), user and household demographics, activities (social networking, communication, device activities, PC activities, Home PC activities, Tablet activities, Game Console activities), and technology spending.

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